Ups and Downs of Marathon Training

3 Weeks to go!

January 17 – 23

Morning Afternoon Notes
Sunday 8 Core
Monday 10 6 10 x 35 sec, Core
Tuesday 21 Long Run
Wednesday 8 6 Core
Thursday 8
Friday Off
Saturday 6
Week Total 73
Cruising along at St Marks! Feeling good for in a few weeks time!

Cruising along at St Marks! Feeling good for in a few weeks time!

For the last five years I have been relatively healthy. Other than four weeks last winter, I have not taken off more than a few days due to injury. All of this is part of the process, and when injury rears its ugly head, how you deal with it is often the most important . A quick and smart reaction can keep a minor leg crap from developing into something much worse. My week started out with a fantastic long run on Tuesday, one that I gained lots of confidence headed into the Trials. Then a little hiccup at the end of the week put a damper on everything, but a quick allowed me to only miss a few days of training.

The Ups

Tuesday’s long run was a standard marathon long run from the Pete Rea playbook. In the build up to Twin Cites, I did this workout on the course, during Cole and my course preview. After a warm up I had a workout of 5, 4, 3, and 1 miles, with a mile float in between each, so 16 miles total. Each segment was supposed to be a tad faster than the previous. We headed to the St. Marks bike path, as that is the closest we can get to what the LA course will be like. We even did the whole workout within the first three miles of the path, to replicate a complete 180-degree turn while running fast.

Workout:
5-4-3-1, mile float between

Overall it was a good workout. I was just a tad faster than what Pete had prescribed, especially on the float, but it all felt relaxed, like I could run that pace in the middle of a marathon. Since this is one of the first workouts that I can compare to my previous build up, that is what I will do!

Splits:
5:01, 5:03, 5:04, 5:07, 5:00 (25:15), 5:36; 
4:59, 4:57, 4:58, 4:57 (19:53), 5:26; 
4:53, 4:51, 4:50 (14:35), 5:38; 4:42 
16 miles in 1:21:10, 5:04 avg.
TC Splits:
5:04, 5:13, 5:00, 4:57, 5:00 (25:14); 5:45;
4:53, 5:00, 4:55, 4:50 (19:38); 5:40;
4:59, 4:53, 4:57 (14:49, Up the hills!); 5:38; 4:50
16 miles in 1:21:34, 5:06 avg.

Looking at the workout as a whole, there is not much difference between the two. I ran only 24 seconds slower over the 16 miles at the TC build up, which most of that time was from having slower floats, like I was prescribed. But the fast floats showed I was able to recover while running fairly fast, and was able to gain some confidence. After each interval was not “dying” to slow down. I was very much in control and trying to slow down. For example the first 400m of my first float was at 5:20 pace and made a conscious effort to slow down even more!

Another thing that really stands out to me is how much more even of a pace I was running this time. On the relatively flat St. Marks bike path, I was able to find a good rhythm and cruise. This was probably another reason why I was able to recover while being so relaxed on the floats. I must also mention that the Twin Cites course is much hillier than the bike path, which changed how I ran the workout. I specifically remember gaining great deal of confidence from being able to run sub 5 minute miles up those late hills on the TC course, knowing that if I could do that in the race, I would put myself in a good position to win. With that confidence, I made my move on those hills and broke open the race, running 4:55, 5:01, and 5:02 for miles 20-23.

The biggest difference that is not shown in the times is how I felt. During the workout, I kept it much more in control. This build up, I am not trying to hit the workouts “out of the park.” And sticking with the baseball analogy, it is much better to be a Joe DiMaggio and have a 56 game hitting streak and a .325 career batting average, than Barry Bonds, all drugs aside, and hit 762 home runs, but strikeout over 80 times a season (Joe only struck out 34 times a season). Now, I am a much more accomplished runner. I am the 2014 USA Marathon Champion, broke 4 for the mile, and just finished my most successful season in the fall. And this has led me to not have to prove anything in workouts, like I did last time (running sub 5 up those hills). In these last 18 months, my entire view of training has changed. I am more focused on keeping everything a bit more restrained, knowing that getting quality workouts in is more important than running hard, and placing my trust in Pete and the process.

While on the topic, some great advice from LetsRun founder Weldon Johnson is “there are no bonus points for running ‘hard.’ The point is to run fast. There is a difference.” (Also the whole article is a good read). This idea is something that one often has to learn the hard way, which was the way I learned it.

The last mile was supposed to be fastest of the day. In the TC workout, it was the fastest, but tied for the fastest, and I was exhausted when I finished. There was not much faster I could have run. On Tuesday, I elected to finish the workout on the slight uphill of the first mile of the bike path, again replicating the finish of LA. Also I snowballed it on the quarters. While I was working hard to run pace, every quarter would approach and I could easily find another gear, so by the end I was running around 4:30 pace! From this I was able to gain confidence that I will be able to run fast the last few miles at the trials.

The Downs

The afternoon of the workout, my right quad was a little sore. But with a harder effort, that can be expected, so I ignored it. The next day, the soreness was gone and I had completely forgotten about it. Then on Thursday, two days after the workout, I was 3 miles or so into the run and my quad was starting to feel really sore and tight. Now I was fully aware of it, but since the pain was not sharp or changing my stride, I just dealt with it. A few miles later it began to spasm and I had to stop for a couple of minutes. I started running slowly and for a few minutes the pain receded back to the previous level. Then it struck again and I was stopped in my tracks. After that I had trouble starting again, and when I did, I could tell my stride was off and it hurt placing weight on my leg. With so much on the line in LA, I took the hard route and began to walk and hitched a right the few miles back to the starting area.

While the hard choice to make is to cut the run short and not muscle through the pain, it is usually the correct choice. I had to tell myself, that I am very fit right now and a few days easy will not change that fact. I ended up taking Friday completely off and pushed an easy, tester run on Saturday to the afternoon to maximize the amount of recovery time between runs. With no pain during the run, only some soreness after, I ran a bit more on Sunday, and yesterday I was back to a pretty standard day. So rather than a small cramp turning into something else, I took a few easy days to remain healthy.

Our annual team dinner at Decent Pizza.

Our annual team dinner at Decent Pizza.

Out of this episode, I can take a few positives. One is how much I have matured and grown. College Tyler would have tried to push through the pain, probably leading to either a more serious quad injury or a compensation injury. I was able to look at the bigger picture and make the better choice in the long term.

Another positive is that it was a reminder to keep up on the little things, like hydration, stretching, and nutrition. My first year at Western, Coach Vandenbusche (and more on him later) would say that it takes 10 things to make a good runner. I often forget the first nine. There were things like eating well, taking vitamins, stretching, etc., but the tenth was most important. I can still hear his booming voice, “And all of those I just listed, don’t mean anything if you can’t do the tenth. Stay healthy.” If I am not healthy and running, then doing all the other things is futile. The way to get better is run, it is just all the little things that allow you to stay healthy.

– – –

Before I sign off for the week, I have to share a great website. Coach Vandenbusche built a program at Western that I was fortunate to get to be apart of. I was only under his tutelage for one year, but his legacy has lived on. For over 35 years he was at the helm of a program he built to become one of the best in the NCAA, and I was able to be apart of it. With that said I would like to share one memory I have of Coach.

I when I was looking at colleges to go to, I every other school told me that I could “walk on”. On the other hand, Coach Vandenbusche made a personal visit to my parents’ house and offered me a scholarship. He must have seen some potential in me and took a chance. This was all an awkward kid from Golden needed. Without the confidence that Coach Vandenbusche had in me, I would not have spent six fantastic years in the Gunnison Country, nor would I be where I am now.

In under three weeks time, I will line up on the streets of LA, hoping that I can add to his legacy and the legacy he built at Western State and be the third Olympian from Western.

Here is a video of Coach’s speech, after being inducted into the USA Track and Field Coach’s Association Hall of Fame.

 

 

4 thoughts on “Ups and Downs of Marathon Training

  1. Pingback: Training Log 1/24-1/30 | Website of Tyler Pennel

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  3. Pingback: 2016 US Olympic Marathon Trials | Website of Tyler Pennel

  4. Pingback: 2016 US Olympic Marathon Trials

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