Training Log 1/10-16

Week of Training January 10-16

4 weeks to go!!!

  Morning Afternoon Notes
Sunday 8 6  
Monday 12 8 Drills and Strides
Tuesday 19   Workout
Wednesday 8 6 Core
Thursday 12 8 Core
Friday 12 8 8 x 20 sec, Drills, Core
Saturday 10 5 10 x 35 sec
  Week Total 122  

This week was my highest week ever! But with that said, it is only 4 miles more than my previous highest week, which just so happened to coincide with the same week in my build up to Twin Cities in 2014. Actually my two build ups have been very similar in terms of miles run and even workouts, but there has been some key differences. Pete has been more aggressive in my workouts building up to the Trials. With one successful marathon training cycle under my belt, Pete wanted to push the envelope. The changes are not much, but over the course of a marathon, even a fraction of a percent can make a huge difference.

It was nice to have some company for part of my workout!

It was nice to have some company for part of my workout!

The lone workout for the week was a long one: nearly 80 minutes of running! It started with three miles of in’n’outs on the 200m, followed by a 9 mile progression run, then two miles of 200m in’n’outs. The 200m in’n’outs are inspired by the famous 30-40 workout of Bill Dellinger at the University of Oregon. The goal of the 30-40 is to run 200m alternating 30 seconds and 40 seconds for as long as you can. Looking at the overall pace of this workout, 4:40 or 29:10 for 10,000m, one would expect it to not be too hard, but the changing of pace wears on you. American legend Steve Prefontaine is rumored to have made it around five miles, and current American 10,000m record holder, Galen Rupp, is rumored to have made it around six miles.

Workout:
3 miles of 200m in'n'outs, 5 min rest; 
9 mile progression, 5 min rest;
2 miles of 200m in'n'outs

Since I am in the middle of a marathon cycle, my paces were not going to be the classic 30-40, but a tad slower. Pete wanted me to run around 33-41, which ends up averaging marathon pace. The key to running this workout properly is having the will power to slow down for the float segments, especially early in the workout. Even though I went out a bit fast (37 sec) and the next float was really slow (44), I did a good job of running a consistent pace the rest of the time. I was continually splitting 33 and 41. I reached three miles down the St. Marks bike path, where Andrew and Joe were waiting for me. They had a progression run, so they jumped in for my nine mile progression run. It was nice to have some company along, as much of marathon training is alone, especially the last few weeks as Griff has been on a slightly different schedule.

For the progression run we did the three mile segment on the bike path, with two turn arounds to simulate some of the sharp turns on the Trials course. Since progression runs are a standard workout at ZAP, we have a good gauge on how to run them. The first mile was 5:24 and we cut down and finished with 4:44. I did not want to run anything too aggressive because I had another two miles of 200m in’n’outs, which went well.

Overall it was a good workout. I liked that it touched on all sorts of paces. I had a good portion at 4:30 pace, some at marathon pace, and some at tempo pace. Having segments at different paces helps racing in general. Races, especially championships, are rarely run at an even pace, with competitors throwing in surges to test the field.

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